and/OAR is very happy to present the perfect follow-up to Canadian sound
artist S. Arden Hill's wonderful work featured on the 3-way split release with
Nibo and Vend published by 12k / Line. On
Fade With Consequence, Arden
paints snow canvases with the radiant warm rays of the sun never far away.
Artist: duul_drv
Title: Fade With Consequence
Catalog Number: and/11
Release Year: 2003
Format: CDR
Status: Sold Out

Track List:
01.
Still Flowing Beneath The Ice. There Is Hoarfrost On The Trees
02. A Range Of Outward Emotions On An Awkward Snowy Day
03. -40°c
04. Blue On Day (For Chartier, Günter And Roden)
05. Still Finding Leaves And Sand In My Sleeping Bag
06. Those Birds Are Very Far Away
07. We Don't Have To Fight
08. A Place Not Too Far Out, Just Close To The Perimeter
Igloo  (March 2004)
* * * * 1/2   Winnepeg's Duul_Drv (S. Arden Hill) has refreshed the screen of
microtones and brought a garden-fresh variety to the contemporary minimal
electronics composition forum.
Fade With Consequence contains the natural
sounds many take for granted, those under our feet and in the air, true
organic happenstance. Dedicating this to the loving memory of a relative,
there is the sense of conjuring an elegy to the elements in their honor. Also a
painter, Hill's editing play is surely in union with any brush he wields. I liked
his work with Aperstaatje and 12k/Line - but this has a quintessential
intimacy - as if I am right there in the space, maybe even making the noise
myself.
Fade With Consequence is, to say simply, rapturous. Dedicated to
perhaps some of Hill's influences and proto-peers is the vibrantly invisible
"Blue On Day (for Chartier, Gunter, and Roden)". As I listen closely, I am
recalling experiences of listening to the field recordings of both j.frede and
Seth Nehil. But Duul_Drv makes the spoken tongues of the earth, air and
various growths a digital transfer, leaving only the outer shavings of the
original outdoor scene behind and replicating it in the studio. This is like a
tapestry of static electricity that tries hard to remain inaudible; a bit
challenging, but effective enough to keep the ears pricked for its 40 plus
minutes.  (TJ Norris)
Vital Weekly  (October 2003)
If you thought that the label and/OAR was mostly about field recordings (such
as on their phonography compilations), then these two [this and the Andrew
Duke release] prove you right and wrong. Right, in the way that these use
field recordings in some way, but they are processed to a certain extent, and
not presented as clear, unprocessed events. Work by Duul_Drv, aka S. Arden
Hill, was previously available on 12k/Line and here presents material along
similar lines. Duul_Drv does what some denounce as "laptop ambient" (and
they don't mean it in a very positive way): sparsely orchestrated software
synth lines, with occasional and likewise sparse clicks. At times a deep
bass thump. Bits of field recordings zip through the mass of ambient
sounds. It's altogether a nice release, maybe a bit on the safe side of things,
not aiming for something radically new, but operating in a safe genre that
microsound can be.  (Frans de Waard)
E / I  Magazine  (Winter / Spring 2006)
Microsound fashion is chronically guilty of relying on metaphors of snow and
ice, a sangfroid pose that uses minimalism to conveniently hijack romance
without the vulnerability of explicit sentimentality. However, the Winnipeg
winter pieces that are duul_drv's
Fade With Consequence, a collection of
treated field recordings, pack twice the sublimated humidity and thaw one
expects from a Canadian phonographic composer whose pieces nominally
reference "Hoarfrost On Trees" in "-40 C." While wearing the equally-icy
duul_drv ("dual drive") moniker, S. Arden Hill's music enlists not the air of
cyber-stoic snowy environs, but the human responses engendered by them:
the behaviors of winter campers in self-reliant, kinetic quietude. Each track
here is light, bird-boned but giddy, teeming with life. Some sound marks
irritate when they veer off toward inorganic self-referentiality ("medium as
message" has little to offer in this context). However, Hill has a poet's knack
for creating wonder via naturalism and narrative occlusion, wrapping
listeners in well-crafted Wikiups that retain body heat in the sub-arctic
half-light, lending solid tools for blind navigation.  (William S. Fields)