An eight part electroacoustic work composed of field recordings, electronic,
and metallic sound sources. The title is in reference to volcanic activity, the
Roman god of fire & metalworking, and their symbolic meaning in western
esoteric alchemical tradition.

"This is a kind of movie for the ears... all edges are blurred, and we navigate
on the threshold of real/unreal... like being caught in an interzone where
small magnified details take us on a higher level of perception, perhaps
consciousness... sounds seem to emerge from some elemental crucible
and speak for their own... quite a haunted and evoking walk!"
(Daniel Crokaert - Mystery Sea)
Artist: Dale Lloyd
Title: Vulcan Augmented
Catalog: Number: and/1
Release Year: 2001
Format: CDR
Status: Sold Out

Track List:
01.
Vulcan Augmented 1
02. Vulcan Augmented 2
03. Vulcan Augmented 3
04. Vulcan Augmented 4
05. Vulcan Augmented 5
06. Vulcan Augmented 6
07. Vulcan Augmented 7
08. Vulcan Augmented 8
ReR  (November 2003)
A low key but subtle CD made, it says, from field recordings (I'm guessing
and hearing, including volcanoes - hence the title - and a lot of weather and
wildlife), electronic and metallic sources. Unfortunately, that's all it says;
more information would have been worth having. The sound and pacing
makes you want to know more. A successful and very atmospheric work that
never loses its grip on the material or the ear.  Chris Cutler)
Absurd  (December 2003)
Dale Lloyd's "Vulcan Augmented" is another CDR that I enjoyed listening. It
was the first to listen to when I came back from my holidays and after having
spent 2 weeks on the mountains of continental Greece, I loved the idea of a
CDR that brought in mind some of the most bizarre and obscure moments I
lived there (a feeling I was given also from the RSundin cdr). Dale uses field
recordings, electronic, and metallic sound sources to craft a really dense
atmosphere, often can be labeled as "ambient" or "electroacoustic" but on
one hand is lovely enough and on the other it was my second encounter with
his work, the first being "Like Ulysses" on Staalplaat's Open Circuit Series
and I must admit that I was flattered from the progress Dale has achieved
since that work (which was really dense and bizarre but was giving me the
feeling that there was something missing from its atmosphere). I guess if
you are wondering which work of his to use as a starting point, then it be this
one. (Nicolas Malevitsis)